We Are Human.
I'm Danielle. UCLA Psychology student. My philosophy is kindness.

Here you will find art, poetry, brains, literature, psychology, sociology, LGBTQ issues, astronomy, logic, atheism/agnosticism (Though I respect and admire your faith), music, anatomy, intellects, cats, quotes, and of course; disorder and disarray.

Enjoy.
We Are Human.
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lacarpa:

Rogelio Manzo
lacarpa:

Rogelio Manzo
lacarpa:

Rogelio Manzo
lacarpa:

Rogelio Manzo
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aliteraryescape:

I should be writing my essay..
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"Be with her because you actually want to be with her, because you actually see a potential future with her, not because you are used to being with her, not because you’re scared of the thought that being without them will ruin you. The point of being in a relationship is to enjoy each other’s company, is to be there to support each other when they need it most. No one person, defines who you are. They only compliment you."
Marvin King (via drmng)
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"The human family - originating in one small locale in East Africa a few million years ago - wandered, separated, diversified, and became strangers to one another…"
Carl Sagan, Billions and Billions (via whats-out-there)
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likeafieldmouse:

Andreas Zingerle
likeafieldmouse:

Andreas Zingerle
likeafieldmouse:

Andreas Zingerle
likeafieldmouse:

Andreas Zingerle
likeafieldmouse:

Andreas Zingerle
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likeafieldmouse:

Anneè Olofsson
likeafieldmouse:

Anneè Olofsson
likeafieldmouse:

Anneè Olofsson
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"The secret of attraction is to love yourself. Attractive people judge neither themselves nor others. They are open to gestures of love. They think about love, and express their love in every action. They know that love is not a mere sentiment, but the ultimate truth at the heart of the universe."
Deepak Chopra (via lazyyogi)
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"That is the secret of happiness and virtue - liking what you’ve got to do. All conditioning aims at that: making people like their unescapable social destiny."
Aldous Huxley, Brave New World (via bettertobequotable)
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hardhatpartycat:

neurosciencestuff:

Children as young as three recognise ‘cuteness’ in faces of people and animals
Children as young as three are able to recognise the same ‘cute’ infantile facial features in humans and animals which encourage caregiving behaviour in adults, new research has shown.
A study investigating whether youngsters can identify baby-like characteristics – a set of traits known as the ‘baby schema’ – across different species has revealed for the first time that even pre-school children rate puppies, kittens and babies as cuter than their adult counterparts.
The discovery that young children are influenced by the baby schema – a round face, high forehead, big eyes and a small nose and mouth – is a significant step towards understanding why humans are more attracted to infantile features, the study authors believe.
The baby schema has been proven to engender protective, care-giving behaviour and a decreased likelihood of aggression toward infants from adults.
The research was carried out by PhD student Marta Borgi and Professor Kerstin Meints, members of the Evolution and Development Research Group in the School of Psychology at the University of Lincoln, UK.
Marta said: “This study is important for several reasons. We already knew that adults experience this baby schema effect, finding babies with more infantile features cuter.
“Our results provide the first rigorous demonstration that a visual preference for these traits emerges very early during development. Independently of the species viewed, children in our study spent more time looking at images with a higher degree of these baby-like features.
“Interestingly, while participants gave different cuteness scores to dogs, cats and humans, they all found the images of adult dog faces cuter than both adult cats and human faces.”
The researchers carried out two experiments with children aged between three and six years old: one to track eye movements to see which facial areas the children were drawn to, and a second to assess how cute the children rated animals and humans with infantile traits.
Pictures of human adults and babies, dogs, puppies, cats and kittens were digitally manipulated to appear ‘cuter’ by applying baby schema characteristics. The same source images were also made less cute by giving the subjects more adult-like features: a narrow face, low forehead, small eyes, and large nose and mouth – making this study more rigorous than previous work.
The children rated how cute they thought each image was and their eye movements were analysed using specialist eye-tracking software developed by the University of Lincoln.
The research could also lead to improved education in teaching children about safe behaviour with dogs.
Professor Kerstin Meints, Professor in Developmental Psychology at Lincoln’s School of Psychology, supervised the research.
She said: “We have also demonstrated that children are highly attracted to dogs and puppies, and we now need to find out if that attractiveness may override children’s ability to recognise stress signalling in dogs.”
“This study will also lead to further research with an impact on real life, namely whether the ‘cuteness’ of an animal in rescue centres makes them more or less likely to be adopted.”
This research was published in the scientific journal Frontiers in Psychology.

wow.,
i know every time my now adult dogs look at me I’m like “i know, bby. i know.” and start comforting them for no reason.
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"When “i” is replaced with “we” even illness becomes wellness."

Malcolm X (via amorestavivo)

This changed me.

(via losingfatfindingfit)

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enlighteningart:

Vincent van Gogh
A Vase of Roses, 1890
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h-o-r-n-g-r-y:

“An arrow can only be shot by pulling it backward. So, when life is dragging you back with difficulties, it means that it’s going to launch you into something great, so just focus and keep aiming.”